The expectation in the motorsports world is that Ford’s new 2.3L EcoBoost platform in the new 2015 Mustang will become a head-turner as the performance aftermarket begins to make inroads into discovering the capabilities of the new engine. Ferrea had a host of new products on display in their PRI booth centered around improving airflow and performance from the new design sitting on a cylinder head ported by David Localio at Headgames Motorworks.

“We think this new EcoBoost engine is going to be the largest engine that Ford displays worldwide. We ended up doing the valvetrain components with a single valvespring, a titanium retainer, and new valves. We’re going to offer the valves in both our 6000 Series and also our Competition Plus Series,” says Ferrea’s Zeke Urrutia.

“The 6000 Series is the direct-replacement performance-oriented valve to be used with a stock turbo and ECU upgrades where you’re increasing the turbo boost. The Competition Plus Series will work with engines making upwards of 30 pounds of boost pressure. We’re also looking at doing a dual valvespring for those racers with bigger camshafts, more RPM, and bigger turbo setups.”

The Ferrea retainers will be offered in tool steel for the performance enthusiasts, and also titanium offerings for those working with more aggressive setups.

Urrutia says that the components will be available for delivery no later than March, and enthusiasts can currently order valves as a special item until the components hit production. The valves will be available in standard dimensions and a 1mm oversize for both intake and exhaust for the most aggressive performers.

Performance was improved throughout the ports and bowl area by working on it, and Localio says he was very impressed with the head's performance.

“The bowl area of the head’s really choked up from the factory. We took .170-inch of material out to maximize performance. We picked up 70 cfm of flow on the intake and 60 cfm on the exhaust side without even doing a valvejob. The exhaust is still 86 percent of the intake, which is where we want to be,” says Headgames’ Localio.

The cylinder head on the flowbench at Headgames Motorworks.

The cylinder head on the flowbench at Headgames Motorworks.

Localio notes that the combustion chamber is shrouded and there are a lot of sharp edges to be removed in the chamber that improve performance as well. We’ll be covering the gains possible on a full port of the cylinder head in the future as we work together with Headgames on another project over the winter.

Ported on the left, stock on the right. Photo courtesy Headgames Motorworks.

Ported on the left, stock on the right. Photo courtesy Headgames Motorworks.

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