For greasy-shirted gearheads like those of us here at StangTV, leaving well enough alone is simply a trait we don’t possess or choose to actively employ. Sure, something may be great right out of the box, but the only thing that means is some how, some way, we can improve upon it. Just picture Tim “The Tool Man” doing his little grunt here. This quite possibly rings true for the Mustang faithful more than any other, who have made the legendary Blue Oval pony car the alpha hobbyist vehicle for much of the last 46 years. You’d be hard pressed to find any Mustang, anywhere, that hasn’t had some sort of performance modification done. It might as well just be a requirement for purchase.

The newest iteration of the Mustang has been headlined by the glorious return of the five liter engine that fans have sorely missed for the last 15 years since the original was retired with the 1995 model year GT. The new 5.0L-equipped models, less than a year into their production, already stand poised to become one of the greatest versions of the car to ever wear the Mustang badge. The buying public and subsequently the aftermarket manufacturers can’t seem to get enough of it, and that spells good news for everyone.

The 412 horsepower, 302-cubic inch “Coyote” engine, with it’s 11:1 compression ratio and strong internals, proved its capability to take some boosted punishment right out of the gate, which has led to an astounding number of boosted 2011’s running around on the street and the strip. Supercharger and turbocharger manufacturers have jumped on board to satisfy the demand, but with so many quality options on the market, deciding on the right purchase can be a tough ordeal. To take some of that headache away, we’ve compiled a handful of the top forced induction kits on the market designed specifically for the 2011 and up 5.0 Mustang, right here, in one place. And to accomplish that, we’ve spoken with some of the most revered names in the business.

Hellion & Fastlane – Represent the turbocharging side of things, represented by NMRA champ John Urist and Nick Field.  They are two of the most respected up-and-coming names in the performance aftermarket, and each have produced single turbo kits that take the 5.0L to new heights with incredible performance potential. Meanwhile, the rest of our guide is composed of seven supercharger manufacturers, all with a rich history in the Ford and automotive high performance market.

ProCharger – One of the leading drag racing and street supercharger manufacturers, has been producing units for the venerable Mustang since the fox body era and in 2011, has delivered three differing kits all aimed at specific segments of enthusiasts with their HO, Stage II, and Cog Race units.

Ford Racing – With their direct R&D connection to Ford has done likewise with three kits that produce 525 and 624 horsepower, as well as a Tuner kit for the do-it-yourself crowd.  The kit comes with a 2.3L twin-screw supercharger and heat exchanger. When installed by a Ford dealer, the 525 horsepower kit will retain your factory engine guarantee.

Paxton and Vortech – This famed duo have brought a double threat to the 2011 Mustang market via a centrifugal supercharger, with Paxton producing a kit based on their NOVI 2200 compressor, while Vortech is utilizing their V3-Si Trim supercharger to get the job done with over 600 horsepower. Both kits come with a front mount intercooler, which is different from their previous water-to-air S197 intercooled kits.

Edelbrock’s E-Force – The kit features an Eaton TVS rotor-based supercharger, along with a large intercooler, intercooler water pump, fuel injectors, fuel rails, a handheld calibration module with preloaded tunes, and all belts, tensioners, hoses, and other necessary components that make this a complete, ready-to-install kit.

Magnuson – Magnuson Products started from a clean slate with their new supercharger offering for the 5.0 Mustang, which uses a high-helix MP2300 TVS supercharger, derived from Eaton’s “Twin Vortices Series” rotating unit. All other components in this kit were designed and created by Magnuson and includes everything necessary for installation. All the belts, hoses, electrical connectors and harnesses, bolts, pulleys, brackets, intercooler, and reservoir are all part of the kit. As well, Flashpaq tuning is supplied.

Roush – The newest offering from Roush for the 5.0 is the RoushCharger system. Largely a carryover from the 2010 package in terms of hardware, the new Roush supercharger system for the 2011-2012 GT utilizes an Eaton-based TVSR-2300 roots-style RoushCharger and features a high flow fuel rail, 47 lb/hr fuel injectors plus more. As well, it incorporates a high efficiency, full face air-to-water intercooler with a large degas bottle like that found in the 2010 kit.

This article is the first installment in what will be a multi-part guide to performance upgrades for the 2011 and up 5.0 Mustangs, so keep it tuned right here for everything Coyote. With that said, let’s move on and take an in-depth look at each of the forced induction systems mentioned above.

ProCharger’s Three-Headed Attack


The Kits

ProCharger has developed not one, not two, but three self-contained supercharger kits available for the 2011 Mustang. “All of these kits are built around our self-contained supercharger head unit and our effective air-to-air intercooling system that’s less complex and more efficient. As well, they also feature a dedicated drive belt system. No one else offers this kind of coverage; from an entry level kit with no trimming on up to a fully race-designed kit,” explained Jeff Lacina, Marketing Director with Procharger.

Base kit – The HO Intercooled System, utilizes the proven P-1SC-1 supercharger making 7 pounds of boost in conjunction with an air-to-air intercooler and a dedicated 8-rib drive, meaning the drive belt isn’t shared with any other engine-mounted components.

Said Lacina, “The HO requires no cutting or trimming of any factory components. It is a pure bolt-on, and it’s our entry level kit, if you will. That is, if you want to call 624 horsepower entry level.”

Stage II kit – Incorporates a larger front-mounted intercooler, fabricated cooling tank, a specially designed radiator fan shroud, and a larger air filter. It uses the very same P-1SC-1 supercharger with 7 pounds boost, but is capable of producing more horsepower over the HO and makes a great kit if you plan to upgrade the blower size down the road.

Cog Race - Designed for more dedicated racing machines with built engines. This particular kit can use one of Prochargers’ many units, including he f-1D, F-1, F-1A, F-1C, and F-1R with ratings between 1,000 and 1,300 horsepower. Other features include a billet aluminum bracket and tensioner pulley, cog crank pulley, and a 50mm dedicated cog drive belt.

Installation Notes

The base HO system, with its smaller intercooler, fits into the front grill as if it belonged there, with a simple bolt-on installation requiring no cutting or aftermarket parts for fitment. The stage II, with its larger intercooler and revised piping layout, requires some trimming to the inside of the lower front fascia and the use of the included fan shroud and coolant overflow tank. The hardcore racing Cog setup requires no extra trimming.

Minimum installation time is around four hours, and will require the use of a small saw for cutting the front fascia on the Stage II kit.  The HO kit requires no cutting.

Horsepower Claims

Crank Horsepower – HO: 600, Stage II: 615, Cog: 1,300+

Rear Wheel Horsepower – HO: 523 HP, Stage II: 615+, Cog: 1,000-1,300

Pricing

HO System: $5,986; Tuner: $5,196

Stage II System: $6,396; Tuner: $5,696

Cog: $7,196

Fuel/CARB Requirements

All three kits are non-CARB legal and require the use of 91-93 octane fuel.

Real World Testing


StangTV recently published a complete installation and dyno test of a Procharger HO unit on a 2011 Mustang, producing 523 RWHP for an increase of 165 horsepower on the otherwise stock engine. To view the complete article, click here.

We were absolutely stunned by the power gains with ProCharger's HO supercharger kit. Even on the first pull we were over 500 RWHP. By the second pull the vehicle's factory wide-band oxygen sensor and made the corresponding changes it needed to make and we blasted off a 523 RWHP pull in the 100 degree heat. Picking up 165 horsepower with 7 pounds of boost left us satisfied to say the least.

Magnuson Products’ Magnacharger


The Kit

Magnuson Products started from a clean slate with their new supercharger offering for the 5.0 Mustang, which uses a high-helix MP2300 TVS supercharger, derived from Eaton’s “Twin Vortices Series” rotating unit. All other components in this kit were designed and created by Magnuson and includes everything necessary for installation. All the belts, hoses, electrical connectors and harnesses, bolts, pulleys, brackets, intercooler, and reservoir are all part of the kit. As well, Flashpaq tuning is supplied. “The core assembly is based on an Eaton-manufactured rotating assembly, and so we’ve aligned ourselves with the largest manufacturer of original equipment superchargers,” said Michael Hewitt. “And as a result, having the reputation for durability that goes along with an OEM manufactured part, we feel that our role in attacking the Ford market is simply piggybacking on some history that’s been well established.”

Installation Notes

A relatively skilled technician or mechanic can install this kit in about 8-10 hours. No specialty tools are required, although a right-angle drill motor will be needed for pinning the crankshaft, of which the necessary bits are included. Standard hand tools and a torque wrench will do the trick. You will have to supply your own coolant and water.

Horsepower Claims

Because this is a very new-to-market kit, Magnuson hasn’t yet performed any concrete dyno runs. However, they have designed the kit to produce about six pounds of boost out of the box, which should create in the neighborhood of 120 additional horsepower and 120 ft-lbs of torque as a starting point.

Pricing

Pricing is anticipated to be $6,500-7,500 depending on powdercoat or chrome finish.

Fuel/CARB Requirements

Magnuson is presently seeking CARB approval and once granted, the Magnacharger kit will meet 50-state legal regulations. The minimum octane requirement is 91.

Real World Testing

The Magnacharger 5.0L system has only been installed on one in-house vehicle thus far, and once testing is completed and CARB approval granted, those numbers will be made public. Stay tuned to the Magnuson Products webite for further developments.

Hair Drying The 5.0 With Hellion


The Kit

Hellion Power Systems recently released their new single turbo system for the 2011-2012 Mustang that is fully stainless steel and is a 100% complete kit, including ECU re-calibration. They system can be supplied with turbos ranging from 64mm to 78mm in size, or can be upgraded later for additional power gains.

With this kit, you can produce astounding horsepower numbers with one kit that requires no extra exhaust components or headers. The expected release date for the kit is Q1 of 2011. “The advantage of a Hellion turbo system is that outrageous horsepower numbers are possible with just one kit. And it’s one price, the first time, with more horsepower per dollar than any other setup,” said Hellion’s John Urist.

Installation Notes

Turbo systems may seem complicated, but Hellion has made it a snap. After removal of the factory H-pipe (or aftermarket X-pipe), the Hellion piping attaches to the factory manifolds. Installation of the turbo and intercooler will require removal of the nose of the car. The cold side (intercooler to the engine) consists of three short pipes and plumb directly into the factory throttle body. Injectors are supplied as part of the kit, and no additional fuel system modifications are necessary. Also comes with a hand held tuner for ECU programming with Hellion customer support just a phone call away.

The Hellion single turbo system installs in 8-12 hours and doesn’t require the use of any of special tools or equipment.

Horsepower Claims

At a base setting of 6 pounds of boost on a stock 5.0, this system produces over 600 horsepower, with the capability of making upwards of 950.

Pricing

Kits start at $5,995.

Real World Testing


John Urist and the guys at Hellion have installed the kit on two cars thus far in its development, one those an automatic-equipped ride (pictured) belonging to former NMRA racer Matt Case, which has pulled 520 horsepower to the wheels and 600 at the crank on 6 pounds of boost.

Edelbrock’s E-Force Supercharger System


The Kit

Hot off the printing presses is Edelbrock’s new E-Force Supercharger System, designed exclusively by the performance masters at Edelbrock to provide instant, reliable, and safe horsepower gains for a stock 5.0L Mustang. With minimum air restriction in and out of the supercharger, along with its 15-inch long intake runners, it’s a recipe for the utmost in low end torque and produces the most horsepower with the least amount of boost for safe operating levels on an otherwise stock engine. The system is available with Edelbrock’s 5-year, 60,000 mile warranty for added peace of mind.

The kit features an Eaton TVS rotor-based supercharger, along with a large intercooler, intercooler water pump, fuel injectors, fuel rails, a handheld calibration module with preloaded tunes, and all belts, tensioners, hoses, and other necessary components that make this a complete, ready-to-install kit.

“The features that we feel make our system a winner in the marketplace is the ability to bolt on the full package, complete with calibration, with no need to source any product from anywhere. It is as complete a kit as you will find in superchargers,” said Edelbrock’s Jason Snyder. “Our design philosophy with our supercharger systems is to minimize boost and increase airflow so you can essentially create more power on less boost than our competitors.”

Installation Notes

Installation of the new 5.0L kit is very similar to that of the 4.6L on a 2010 model car, with the use of basic hand tools that should take around 10 hours to complete.

Horsepower Claims

As this is also a brand new system to the market, concrete horsepower and torque figures are not official, but Edelbrock estimates final numbers to be in the neighborhood of 550 horsepower at the crank at 5.5 pounds of boost.

Pricing

Retail MSRP has not been finalized yet, however the price is expected to be between $6,000 and $6,500.

Fuel/CARB Requirements

Edelbrock’s E-Force system will be 50-state legal upon CARB certification and requires the use of 91 octane fuel.

Real World Testing

Because this brand new system is not yet in production, Edelbrock has only tested the unit on their own in-house test vehicles, of which dyno figures will be released in the coming weeks. Stay tuned to Edelbrock’s website for further news on the kit.

Ford Racing Mustang Supercharger System


The Kits

Ford Racing’s engineers worked in close collaboration with Ford powertrain engineers in the development of their 2.3L twin-screw supercharger for the 2011 Mustang. This supercharger system comes as a complete package in three variations: a 525 horsepower kit that carries a full 12 month, 12,000 mile warranty (when installed by a Ford or Mercury dealer technician), an upgraded 624 HP kit, and a tuner kit for racing and high-horsepower enthusiast applications. “We went at some the design of this system with the mentality of an OE installation, and so we feel our kit is a little more thought out, and the hardware is designed to give a long life for the engine and the user,” said Ford Racing’s Jesse Kershaw.

525 HP – Features the 2.3L twin-screw supercharger assembly, intake manifold, complete air-to-liquid intercooler system, injectors, Ford racing ProCal calibrated tuning tool, drive belt, and 12 month/12,000 mile warranty.

624 HP – Includes all of the same components and hardware as the 525 HP base kit, but lacks the Ford 12/12 warranty.

*Note: Both the 525 HP and 624 HP Mustang Supercharger Systems fit only manual transmission-equipped 2011 Mustang GT’s.

Tuner Kit – Uses most of the primary under-hood components of the 525 and 624 HP kits, but lacks the Ford Racing ProCal tuning tool, supercharger pulley, injectors, and the Ford 12/12 warranty.

Installation Notes

Before installing the Mustang Supercharger Kit, Ford Racing requires product registration in order to receive the ProCal II flash tool for recalibration of the PCM. With this kit, consumers have the option of a do-it-yourself or dealership install. Installation requires the removal of re-gapping of factory spark plugs, and necessitates only the use of standard hand tools, tape, and soldering equipment. Ford Racing has provided the complete instruction manual in PDF form on their website.

Horsepower Claims

The base kit produces 525 horsepower at 6,400 RPM and 470 ft-lbs of torque at 4,200 RPM at 7 pounds of boost on 91 octane, while the upgraded system delivers 624 horsepower at 6,900 RPM and 536 ft-lbs of torque at 4,700 RPM on 9 pounds of boost with 93 octane fuel.

Pricing

525 HP System: $7,199 (black); Polished chrome: $7,779

624 HP System: $7,499 (black); Polished chrome: $8,099

Tuner Kit: $6,499 (black); Polished chrome: $7,099

Fuel/CARB Requirements

Both the 525 and 624 horsepower kits are fully CARB certified and 50-state legal, and require the use of 91 octane fuel minimum.

Real World Testing


NMRA Race Pages Editor Jason Reiss got some hands-on experience with the Whipple-supercharged Ford Racing 2011 Mustang, which he detailed in a Race Pages Blog earlier this fall. Read more here. Muscle Mustangs and Fast Fords’ Amsoil 5.0L project car, unveiled at this years’ SEMA Show, sports the base Ford Racing supercharger system and while no dyno numbers have been released, is estimated to produce over 500 horsepower to the crank.

Vortech And Paxton Make A Formidable 5.0L Duo


The Kits

Vortech Superchargers, along with their Paxton brand, bring a stellar one-two punch to the new Mustang GT, with supercharger systems available that utilize popular and proven centrifugal units and come as complete, ready-to-install kits or in tuner form. “Out approach on these kits, moreso the Vortech, was to package the system for the simplest installation possible while maintaining the factory look and allowing for the OEM to be integrated into the system for emissions purposes,” said Vortech’s Engineering Manager Mike Reagan.

Vortech – The standard Vortech high-output system features the V-3 Si-Trim compressor with an air-to-air charge intercooler, complete air inlet assembly, replacement injectors, an SCT hand-held ECU programmer, intercooler, and all the required components and hardware that make this a complete kit. This kit comes with the option of a 20th Anniversary Edition black (limited production) or polished finish.

Vortech also offers the same kit in the tuner variety, coming without the fuel pump, fuel injectors or ECU programmer or any form of ECU recalibration, leaving that to the end-user. Tuner kits are available with the V-1 T-Trim unit for even greater power levels when mated to modified engines.

Paxton – The upcoming Paxton Mustang GT system will utilize the NOVI 2200 compressor and is designed for serious racing and street-strip applications with built engines and is capable of producing upwards of 1,000 horsepower with the same supercharger. Once finalized, the components that will comprise the Paxton system will be very similar to that found in the Vortech package.

The Paxton system is also available as tuner kit, minus the fuel management and tuner/programming.

Installation Notes

Approximate time for installation is 7-9 hours and requires standard hand/power tools and equipment. The base Vortech kit is designed for use on stock, OEM 5.0L Mustangs with a stock PCM and requires only general automotive mechanic knowledge and experience to complete the install.

Horsepower Claims

The base Vortech system with the V-3 Si-Trim compressor outputs roughly 600 horsepower at the flywheel on 7-8 pounds of boost, while the V-1 T-Trim in the Tuner kit is capable of a stout 825 horsepower at the flywheel.

The Paxton system meanwhile will produce in the neighborhood of 620 horsepower at the flywheel out of the box, with power numbers up to four figures attainable with the very same NOVI 2200 unit.

Pricing

Vortech complete system: $5,995; Tuner Kit: $4,995

Paxton complete system: $5,620 (satin finish), $5,995 (polished finish); Tuner kit: $4,695 (satin finish), $4,995 (polished finish)

Fuel/CARB Requirements

Both systems feature a molded air intake tube that mates to the OEM airbox.  This retains the carbon trap, making them capable of being 50-state smog legal and CARB certified, though Vortech/Paxton is currently seeking certification. The minimum fuel requirement is 91 octane.

Real World Testing

Terry “Beefcake” Reeves’ automatic GT utilizes the Vortech V3-Si Trim superchcharger kit, along with Stainless Works 1-7/8″ headers and a custom Jon Lund tune on 93 octane to belt out 528 RWHP and 448 ft-lbs of torque at just under 9 pounds of boost. Reeves recently drove the car four hours to the NMRA Finals and captured the Super Stang crown, running a 10.81 best elapsed time. For more information, including dyno videos, visit the Vortech blog.

Justin Burcham and the JPC Performance crew have pushed their 2011 Mustang to the extreme in pursuit of becoming the quickest 2011 in the country, knocking out over 800 horsepower to the tires with the Paxton Novi 2200 head unit and system. Read more on Paxton’s blog here and here.

Vortech has recently put their in house project 2011 Mustang on the dyno.  It features a standard Vortech kit with a 6 psi pulley.  The only additional modification made to the Mustang was a Borla catback exhaust.  The kit produced a respectable 577 RWHP and 442 lb/ft to the rear tires on a DynoJet.

Fastlane Brings Turbo Expertise to the 5.0L


The Kit

Fastlane Inc. has taken their expertise in turbocharging to the new Mustang and Coyote engine in developing a complete, customizable single turbo system. At this time, Fastlane is only offering the system as an install at their facility in Houston, Texas, but hope to make the kit available as a complete, do-it-yourself package in the near future based on interest and demand from the market.

Fastlane’s system features a 72mm BorgWarner S400 Series turbocharger and a large air-to-air intercooler that all tucks away nicely under the hood. Their system is planned to include everything necessary to get up and running, including Tial wastegates and blow off valves, fuel injectors, and a PCM re-calibration/tune. Said Fastlane’s Nick Field, “This is the only top-mount turbo kit out there for the 5.0L, which provides the benefit of a turbo with the ultimate in efficiency along with an OEM-type install. It’s the right way to build a turbo kit, and we went a lot of trouble to package it under that hood.”

Installation Notes


Installation time is around 10-12 hours using standard tools, and the process does involve some minor welding to complete the reconfiguration of the headers. Due to computer-related issues, the OEM automatic transmission is the only automatic that will work properly with the use of this turbo system at this time.

Horsepower Claims

On an otherwise stock motor, the 72mm system produces 672 horsepower at the crank on 6 pounds of boost, and with a built motor has churned out over 750 at the wheels on 14 pounds of boost.

Pricing

$8,995

Fuel/CARB Requirements

Because the factory airbox has to be removed to make way for the turbocharger setup, this kit lacks CARB certification but is otherwise 49-state legal. Fastlane tunes everything at their shop for 93 octane and recommends the same for end users.

Real World Testing


Fastlane has installed their 72mm turbocharger kit on an in-house GT, producing 672 horsepower at the wheels on the stock engine with 6 pounds of boost and over 750 on a motor with upgraded internals on 14 pounds. This car, which was on display in the SCT booth at this years SEMA Show, has run well into the 10’s in the quarter mile.

The 2011 Gets RoushCharged


The Kit

Roush and the Ford Mustang go hand-in-hand, and it’s only fitting they bring their RoushCharger system to the new 5.0L model. Largely a carryover from the 2010 package in terms of hardware, the new Roush supercharger system for the 2011-2012 GT utilizes an Eaton-based TVSR-2300 roots-style RoushCharger and features a high flow fuel rail, 47 lb/hr fuel injectors, an aluminum fabricated throttle spacer, heavy-duty dedicated first sheave FEAD (front end accessory drive) system, a 90mm pulley, twin 60mm throttle body, and all the necessary wiring, PCV, and vacuum systems that make it a complete kit. As well, it incorporates a high efficiency, full face air-to-water intercooler with a large degas bottle like that found in the 2010 kit.

“Everything that we produce is designed to OEM specifications or better in terms of functionality, quality, installation, and appearance. When you open up the hood, we want our owners to be the thrilled with the end product and have it look like it rolled off the Ford assembly line,” states John Clark. Roush presently has available a tuner kit that lacks calibration software and the full powertrain warranty, offering users the freedom to push the envelope with a custom combination. The complete system is slated to hit the market in the very near future and comes with Roush’s 3-year, 36,000 mile warranty.

Installation notes

For anyone familiar with Roush supercharger installs, there will be little in the way of surprises with this one. The stock induction and intake system have to be removed and replaced with the Roush fuel charging assembly and FEAD, and some basic installation/modification of wiring is required.

Installation is estimated at around 12-14 hours and requires no specialized tooling.

Horsepower Claims


At 10 pounds of boost, the RoushCharger produces 525 rear wheel horsepower at 6,700 RPM and 465 ft-lbs of torque at 4,700 RPM.

Pricing

Complete System: $6,099

Tuner kit: $5,899

Fuel/CARB Requirements

All Roush calibrated versions of this kit are pending EO certification and require the use of premium 91 octane.

Real World Testing

John Starkey and wife Rebecca of VMP Tuning in Florida have outfitted their automatic-equipped GT with a RoushCharger tuner kit coupled with a smaller pulley and custom calibration to produce over 550 horsepower at the wheels. Together with some minor modifications including aftermarket exhaust, lower controls arms, and drag radials — the Mustang blasted out a best of 10.61 at 130 MPH at the NMRA Finals in Bowling Green.

To read more on the VMP Mustang, visit the project car page here.

As you can see, despite the aftermarket manufacturers have already jumped all over the new Mustang in unison with the buying public, ample options for impressive gains in bolt-on horsepower. Among our guide are no less than 15 different kits from 8 industry-renowned manufacturers – some of which entail multiple upgrade options of their own – for a sizeable selection of both the turbocharger and supercharger variety. And like buying underwear, there really is no right or wrong choice. Each system brings to the table its own unique design from a functionality, appearance, and installation standpoint, meaning the decision comes down to what best fits your needs and of course, your budget. Next up? You guessed it. Nitrous Oxide.