Massively thick bulkheads, decks and pan rails highlight the prototype Bear Block Motors new aluminum Coyote block. It is shown here without the replaceable cylinder sleeves installed. (Photo Credit: Bear Block Motors)

Massively thick bulkheads, decks and pan rails highlight the prototype Bear Block Motors new aluminum Coyote block. It is shown here without the replaceable cylinder sleeves installed. (Photo Credit: Bear Block Motors)

While Coyote blocks are proven commodities for hot street action, some guys can wreck iron balls. That usually takes some combination of forced induction and drag strip, but in any case the options for the too-much-is-just-right crowd have been limited.

True, the 5.2-liter Voodoo block is significantly stronger than the stock Coyote, but it’s in limited supply and still a naturally aspirated design. Likewise, Ford Performance Parts offers an R-block for more powerful builds, but even this block has its limits.

Now a new option is surfacing from Bear Block Motors in Chatsworth, California. Bear Block has already delivered an upgraded FE block for the hard-charging Shelby Cobra replica builders, and their take on the Coyote block is also aimed at massive-power applications.

Bear Block Motors opted for conventional flanged cylinder sleeves in its new aluminum Coyote block. The sleeves are much thicker than stock and unlike the cast-in-place Coyote sleeves, are simple to replace.

Bear Block Motors opted for conventional flanged cylinder sleeves in its new aluminum Coyote block. The sleeves are much thicker than stock and unlike the cast-in-place Coyote sleeves, are simple to replace.

That said, the Bear Block aluminum Coyote features stock architecture: the bellhousing, engine mount, cylinder head and front cover employ stock bolt patterns. Past those basics, however, the Bear Block has both bulked up and adopted racier fittings as appropriate.

Most fundamental is a move from the standard modular practice of cast-in cylinder sleeves for replaceable, thicker sleeves. These are conventional sleeves, flanged at the top and recessed into grooves in the block’s deck, plus ground flat on one side of the flange to locate off each other. Where standard Coyote sleeves hover in the 0.060-inch range the Bear Block sleeves measure 0.130 inches. Durability and core-shift concerns are thus lessened; the bore is nominally 3.630 inches.

Obviously the Bear Block Coyote (sounds like post-atomic-age drive-in movie biology) is plain old thicker everywhere. The main webs are nearly 1 inch thick at 24mm, for example, and the pan rails and decks are suitably oversized, too. Bulletproof billet steel forms the main caps and they use 1/2-inch main and 7/16-inch side ARP bolts. Head retention is 12mm ARP 2000 studs mounted deeply in the block—a hallmark of modular architecture—and generally the new block looks boost-ready, to say the least.

There is, however, no provision for a block-mounted oil filter is given, a pair of -12 AN fittings being provided instead.

Currently Bear Block Motors is check fitting its first prototype block. Only minor clearance trimming has been needed and the first article should hit the dyno shortly. It will be followed by a batch of perhaps 20 preproduction blocks with series production anticipated in May.

Pricing has not been set, but can’t be bargain-based; expect it to come in under $5,000.