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When the first generation SVT Raptor hit showroom floors back in 2009, the standard power plant was the readily available 5.4-liter SOHC V8. At the time, this engine had already been powering many of the F-series trucks in its day, and the all-new 6.2-liter SOHC V8 engine was just making headway.

Fast forward to 2012, and the 6.2-liter V8 gained itself a pretty substantial reputation, thanks to a rating of 411 horsepower and 434 lb-ft of torque in the SVT Raptor. In fact, Ford made the 6.2 the exclusive engine for the SVT Raptor moving forward that year.

The 6.2-liter V8 has always captured our interest for many reasons. One of which is how useful this engine could be once it’s been stuffed into a Mustang’s chassis, like this Fox Mustang coupe for example. Many enthusiasts have even considering boring and stroking one of these engines to achieve a modern-day 427 SOHC engine, and swapping it into their Mustang.

The idea of a modern 427 cubic-inch V8 derived from a Mod motor really excites us, so we hit up our friends at Livernois Motorsports and picked their brain on the subject with a few questions to verify if this was even possible.

Images courtesy of Livernois Motorsports

Images courtesy of Livernois Motorsports

1. For the enthusiast who is looking to pull one of these engines from a  junkyard, are there any differences between the 6.2-liter V8 found in the Raptor versus the other F-series trucks, like the F-250?

“For all intents and purposes, the 6.2-liter engines are basically the same,” Mike Schropp of Livernois Motorsports told us. “There are some different camshaft profiles and some minor differences in parts, but they are basically the same engine to work with as a starting point for a build.”

Livernois can provide enthusiasts with just about anything they need for a 6.2-liter V8 engine. From short-blocks to forged pistons and connecting rods, to CNC ported cylinder heads and full long-block assemblies, as detailed below.

Livernois can provide enthusiasts with just about anything they need for a 6.2-liter V8 engine. From short-blocks to forged pistons and connecting rods, to CNC ported cylinder heads and full long-block assemblies, as detailed below.

2. How many cubic inches can the 6.2-liter V8 support if bored and stroked? Would it be possible to recreate a modern interpretation of the Ford 427 cubic-inch SOHC V8 engine?

“This will somewhat depend on whether an enthusiast is going naturally aspirated, or with a power adder,” Mike said. “There is a limitation on maximum amount of bore, and the crank can be modified to create a longer stroke. However, the only way to get to a true 427 cubic-inches is with a custom crankshaft. There are no limitations if you get a custom crankshaft and corresponding components to match.”

Tri-Armor coated bearings, custom stroker forged pistons at 9.5:1 compression ratio, and custom stroker forged I-beam connecting rods make for a mean 6.6-liter V8 engine for your Raptor or Mustang project from Livernois.

3. What would someone need to achieve 427 cubes and what are the roadblocks along the way?

“The biggest challenge is mostly just the lead time in regards to getting a custom crankshaft,” Mike said. “Everything else can be custom ordered and arrive within 4 to 6 weeks, but crankshafts can take anywhere from 12 to 16 weeks to receive.”

The baddest Raptor engine to date is the Powerstorm Extreme 6.6-liter V8 stroker long-block from Livernois

The baddest Raptor engine to date is the Powerstorm Extreme 6.6-liter V8 stroker long-block from Livernois

4. Livernois offers packages for the 6.2-liter Raptor engine, most notably the 6.6-liter (400 cubic-inch) short-block and long-block package. Why you did you decide on 6.6-liters of displacement for this package?

“The 6.6-liter engine we offer is based around the max bore and stroke we want in a power adder application,” Mike explained. “This keeps the crankshaft strong enough to support higher power, and keeps the bores thick enough for higher power; better sealing, and better long-term durability. We’ve made 800-plus horsepower with this combination–and we’ve never had any issues with the components or the engines at these power levels. The drivetrain tends to become a weak link at these high power levels, however.”

The long-block assembly from Livernois includes just about everything you need to drop one of these engines directly into a SVT Raptor.

5. When building one of these engines–is everything basically a custom application since there isn’t a lot of aftermarket support for them or are some components interchangeable, since this engine is technically part of the modular family?

“Everything is specific to the 6.2. It’s completely it’s own architecture with no compatibility with any other Ford engine. This is why we’ve designed all of the components for it specifically–because there are no other options that exist. So the rods, piston, cranks, head packages, camshafts, springs, etc–are all custom parts Livernois has designed,” Mike concluded.